Moving to the US for Aussies

Chapter 4: 

The Inconvenient Truth

Australians have a capacity to be direct, and a book written by Australians should be nothing less.

Think of this chapter as your friends dishing out some tough love.  They just want to be sure that you can separate fact from fiction.

Let’s first address the Elephant in the room

For those who move to the US with the support of their employer, the machinations of relocating to a new city is for the most part transparent.  They arrive to a job, an apartment, and their greatest challenge may be finding their new favorite restaurant.

However, the plight of the Aussie who lands in NYC looking for work, is a very different story.  They must start from nothing and rely on savings to sustain them throughout their job search.  Their hope is that they will be gainfully employed in their sunny new apartment in six to eight weeks because they read on social media that US employers are lining up to hire Aussies.

For most, the harsh reality is that finding work takes between three to six months, and their savings run out well before a second interview.  This is the inconvenient truth for many Australians.

Over the past decade we have witnessed the emergence of the E-3 Hopeful.  An Australian who may be visiting the US as a tourist, but would see it as an opportunity if they were offered a career in the US.

No-one should ever tell you that you cannot follow your dreams, especially not in New York.  However many Australians are completely unaware of the fact that it is illegal to enter the US on a tourist visa for the purpose of seeking employment.

Just in case you missed that last point, it is illegal to enter the US on a tourist visa, and look for work.  

Clearly, there will be those who say “I know someone who had no problem”, and if you search on social media you will find all too many willing to add their 2c on this topic.

But you can be assured that for every hearsay account, there are dozens of Australians who have been detained at a US border and deported for unwittingly telling an Immigration agent that they are here to look for work on a Tourist/B Visa, or posting something that was flagged on their Facebook page or in their LinkedIn profile.

Like any relationship, if you are going to court Lady Liberty based on a lie, it could result in a very nasty break up.

Certainly there are instances where a tourist has been offered a job through a random set of circumstances, but even in this situation there are laws and guidance that need to be understood before you can start the visa application process.

The Law

Under 9 FAM 302.9-4(B)(3), the 30/60 day rule is used when a nonimmigrant violates his or her status in one of the following ways within 30/60 days of entry:

  • Actively seeking unauthorized employment and, subsequently, engaged in such employment;
  • Enrolling in a full course of academic study without the benefit of appropriate change of status;
  • Marrying and taking up permanent residence; or
  • Undertaking any other activity for which a change of status or an adjustment of status would be required, without the benefit of such a change or adjustment.

The 30/60 day rule generally arises with regard to nonimmigrants who enter the United States on B status. The purpose of the 30/60 day rule is to help consular officers determine whether the nonimmigrant willfully misrepresented a material fact regarding his or her application for a visa.

New USCIS Guidance has the 30/60 Day Rule extended to 90 Days!

Anyone reading this who has successfully found work while on an ESTA or a B visa, you are among the last of your breed.  US Immigration have tightened regulations and are now enforcing denial of applications for change of visa status now within 90 days.

So, if you were theoretically offered a job, and you traveled to a US Embassy somewhere warm within 90 days, even though your paperwork may be perfect, your E-3 application can be pushed to Administrative Processing or in a worst case scenario, denied the grounds of Misrepresentation.

If your application is denied at an Embassy outside of Australia, and your return ticket to Australia is ex a US port, you are going to have to find a new way home for both you and any possessions as you will also be denied entry back into the US.

What you don’t know, will hurt you.

Discovering that your planned move to the US is based on bad assumptions often comes too late for many expats.  The vision of finding work and moving into your own apartment in less than three months is simply unrealistic for most.

Assuming that you will have a job within six weeks is one of the most common bad assumptions.

Finding Work

Firstly, if someone told you that finding work in New York is easy -unless you are a CPA with Big Four accounting experience – they are lying.  A recent article in News.com.au discussed the challenges facing Australians seeking work in the US.

“The simple fact is that a surplus of E-3 Visas does not mean a surplus of jobs”

Understanding that finding work is not as simple as most believe comes as a shock to many Australians.  It can take anywhere from three to six months… or longer to find work.  For anyone who may be seeking work, there is a real prospect that even after six months, you may still be jobless.

The rookie mistakes are submitting a multi page CV as opposed to a one page Resume, having a “.au” in your email address or a +61 in front of your phone number.  Our Perfect Resume template assists members in producing a professional, one page, US resume.

Feedback from members is that posting on job boards can be a complete waste of time.

The one thing that can most damage your chances of ever finding work is reaching out to employers from Australia: It simply demonstrates a lack of commitment.  You have to have boots on the ground to be taken seriously.

An E-3D may find more job opportunities given that they do not have the same professional or full time requirements of the E-3, but it takes 90 to 120 days to process an Employment Authorization Document.

E-3Ds face the same challenge of applying for jobs too soon if they do not have their EAD in hand.  The Australian Community has been providing guidance based on Recruiter and Employer feedback, which is that it is a very different conversation between “I am still waiting on my EAD” and “I have my EAD”.

For the E-3 Hopeful Aussie, their initial challenges are not only to prove that they are better qualified than an American worker –  and explain the E-3 process without using the word “sponsorship” – but overcome further headwinds created by the USCIS promoting the Buy American, Hire American Executive Order to US companies.

Credit and Banking

Everything from opening a mobile phone account to renting an apartment is governed by your credit rating.  There are three Credit Agencies that give you a credit score and they can range between 280 and 900.

Image result for credit rating

In the example above, a good credit score is  above 700, however let’s look at the factors that get you there.

  • Amount of Credit – The more credit you have, the better your score.
  • How much is Debt? – Paying off your credit card bill each month improves your score just as carrying credit balances forward hurts your score.
  • Any late payments? – If you miss a monthly payment, that is a major ding on your credit score.
  • Hard Inquiries – If a lender, retail store or credit card company performs a credit check, this is a ding on your credit score. The more hard inquiries, the more it hurts your score.
  • A Mortgage – It is a little chicken and egg, but if you have a mortgage and you pay on time this can boost your score.  However missing a mortgage payment is a worst case scenario for your credit score.

Special Note: If you receive a “You have been approved…” letter in the mail, ignore it.  You are not approved as it is just a marketing ploy by the credit card company.

If you are just starting out you do not have a reasonable score so you will most probably be denied AND the Hard Inquiry will actually hurt your score!

 

There is a plethora of information on the web about building credit, but it has to start somewhere.  Fortunately for our members we have built a great relationship with HSBC’s expat services.

Under this program members of The Australian Community can access credit not only here in the US, but before they arrive in the US so they have a US Bank account and credit score on arriving.  Details are in this article.  

Leasing your own Apartment 

With the advent or Airbnb and social media groups, short term accommodation has become a commodity item.  Many Expats arrive in the US having already secured some form of accommodation – outside of a Hotel.

Do your homework!  Check real estate websites to understand what the real cost of renting is in NYC.  Share accommodation will be at least $1,200 to $1,500 per month for the smaller of a two bedroom apartment in an OK area in the City.

Living month to month in short term accommodation or in a communal dwelling is clearly not how most Australians envision living in the US.  Their goal is to have their own apartment.

Firstly finding an apartment for under $2,500 per month in Manhattan, or even the better parts of Brooklyn and Queens is the first challenge.  But where the real challenge arises is that your credit score is an essential consideration when a Landlord or agent looks at a tenant application.

Unless you have full time employment and a good credit score, your application will most likely be denied.  A hard inquiry on your credit history may rub salt into the wound.

Paying six month of rent in advance can assist in overcoming Landlord concerns, but not everyone has the financial resources to shell out a minimum of US$15,000 up front.

If you never have to sofa surf for an extended period of time, fall victim to an accommodation scam, or constantly live with the anxiety about finding your next short term rental, you are among the lucky few.

Don’t forget to file your Form AR-11 to notify USCIS of your change of address within 10 days – the penalties include fines and Deportation!

Health Insurance

Not having health insurance in the US is like not wearing a seat belt – you can do it, but if something happens, the consequences can be devastating.  Travel insurance is not health care and non-residents have eligibility challenges for certain health care plans.

Often, there is no simple way to overcome the health insurance gap between arriving in the US and going onto your new employers health plan or “Obamacare”.  Going six to nine months without a health insurance plan is a real prospect for some Expats.

Compared to Australia Health Insurance costs in the US are astronomical.  This is why your US Employee Benefits can be as much a consideration as salary when considering a job offer. 

To put costs in perspective, a Family plan from the NY Health Exchange can cost $2,000 per month in premiums and you still have a $35 copay for a Doctor visit.  A Family could also have to pay $4,000 to $8,000 in an annual deductible, taking their yearly health costs to north of $30,000 if you include Dentistry.

If you think that is expensive, an emergency appendectomy can cost between $20,000 and $30,000.

It is important to understand that not all employers offer immediate health coverage for their new workers.  You may have to wait as much as 90 days before your benefits kick in.

Due to its complexity, Health Insurance plans will be covered in a separate chapter.

US Drivers License

In New York State, the Law says that if you maintain a New York address for 90 Days you are considered a New York Resident.  It also states that after 90 days, you have just 30 days to convert International and out of State licenses  to a NYS Drivers License.

Simply put, if you intend to drive in New York State for more than 120 days, you need a New York Drivers License.

Social media has made a dog’s breakfast of this subject with anecdotal stories of using your Aussie Drivers license to rent cars, or posts containing “How will the Cop know if you get pulled over”.   NY Law says that after 120 days, your Australian license is no longer valid and if you are pulled over it is the same as driving without a license.

Lie to a State Trooper and your day is going from bad to worse.  Rule No. 1 applies here – Obey The Law!

Yes, it is inconvenient, but after studying for a computer test, taking a driver education class and passing your driving exam, you are good to go.  It’s not as if you need to learn how to drive – other than keeping right instead of left!

The benefits of a NYS license are felt every time you are asked to produce ID.  A NYS license carries much greater weight than an Australian license – especially with domestic air travel.

The only Guarantees are Death and Taxes

Over the last six years, The Australian Community has been assisting its members overcome many of the challenges of living in the US.  Albeit that within its Private Social Network are both Employment and Mentoring Groups, our Public Charity is not a silver bullet for finding work.

Yes Employers occasionally post jobs within our Network, but our role is to provide guidance to those seeking work, not to act as an employment agency or a legal firm.  If someone were to join our organization with the expectation that they will be offered a job or receive free legal advice, then they would be mistaken.

In NYC it is 60% who you know and 40% what you know.  Making a personal connection with a Recruiter or an Advocate within an organization is your best bet to finding work.  You can be assured more members have found work by making connections at our events, than posts within our Employment group.

Australians have a mindset for problem solving and finding ways to overcome adversity.  This same mindset should never be applied to US Law.

Social media serves as a good reference for day to day challenges and feedback from other Australians on where to find things.  However seeking visa advice outside of which Embassy has the fastest E-3 turnaround, can get you into serious hot water.

We are seeing an increase in E-3 applications being moved to Administrative Processing, and this is causing serious concerns for those effected Australians.

Our organization has always recommended seeking professional advice on any matter that effects your Health, Liberty or Finances.  We do understand that some E-3 applications are very straightforward, but if your decision not to use a lawyer is based purely on affordability, then how do you expect to pay $3,000 to 4,000 per month just to keep the lights on in NYC?

What Next?

Committing to any relationship is a big step, and moving to New York is one of the greatest commitments you will make.

All too often we hear of Aussies, even with Green Cards, who return home within a few months having failed to find work.  New York is not for everyone, even for people born in this country.

Often, the return home is due to a miscalculation of finances, or the length of time it takes for the interview process.  More often than not, it was the perception that finding work is easy for Australians, and that is simply not the case.

Our organization does not purport to have all of the answers, but we are quite vocal about educating our members on the right questions to ask.  Providing answers is up to the professionals, and we can certainly connect our members to someone who has the right answer!

Suggested reading:

Top 10 Tips for Australian Job Seekers in New York

Top 10 Australian Expat Mistakes you don’t want to make

The Top 10 Questions asked by Australians living in New York 

You can also learn more and Join The Australian Community 

This chapter concludes our public postings of Moving to the US for Aussies.  The reaming chapters will be posted exclusively to our Private Member Network.

Aussie Cafés in NYC – and where to find them: Boundless Plains Espresso

There are literally dozens of Australian businesses who have opened shop in New York.  Some we know well, and others not so well.

We want our readers to learn about these businesses, where they are located, as well as share the personal stories of their owners.

We spoke with Jo Black, the Founder of Boundless Plains– a new Aussie café located on Rector Street in the Financial District of New York City. Continue reading “Aussie Cafés in NYC – and where to find them: Boundless Plains Espresso”

Aussie Businesses in NYC – and where to find them: Scanlan Theodore

There are literally dozens of Australian businesses who have opened shop in New York.  Some we know well, and others not so well.

We want our readers to learn about these businesses, where they are located, as well as share the personal stories of their owners.

We spoke with Melinda Robertson and Sarah Blank to learn more about their business Scanlan Theodore located at 117 Prince Street in SoHo. Continue reading “Aussie Businesses in NYC – and where to find them: Scanlan Theodore”

Aussie Businesses in NYC – and where to find them: Save Your Sole

There are literally dozens of Australian businesses who have opened shop in New York.  Some we know well, and others not so well.

We want our readers to learn about these businesses, where they are located, as well as share the personal stories of their owners.

We spoke with Amanda Collins to learn more about her business Save Your Sole located at 1 Little West 12th St in NYC. Continue reading “Aussie Businesses in NYC – and where to find them: Save Your Sole”

Aussie Businesses in NYC – and where to find them: Three Seat Espresso & Barber

After a very positive response to our series of articles featuring Aussie Cafés in NYC, we are posting a series featuring Australian small businesses operating in New York.

We want our readers to learn about these businesses, where they are located, as well as share the personal stories of their owners.

We spoke with Aaron Cook, the Founder of Three Seat Espresso & Barber – a Barber Shop AND Café – located on Avenue A in New York City.

Continue reading “Aussie Businesses in NYC – and where to find them: Three Seat Espresso & Barber”

Aussie Businesses in NYC – and where to find them: Sweat Yoga

After a very positive response following a series of articles featuring Aussie Cafés in NYC, we will be posting a series featuring Australian small businesses operating in New York.

We want our readers to learn about these businesses, where they are located, as well as share the personal stories of their owners.

We spoke with Wade Helliwell, the 6’11’ Australian professional Basketball player at his studio Sweat Yoga in New York City. Continue reading “Aussie Businesses in NYC – and where to find them: Sweat Yoga”

Aussie Cafés in NYC – and where to find them: Southern Cross Coffee

There has been a ton of recent press featuring Aussie cafés in NYC.  Most feature either the highly successful coffee chains or those found only in NoLIta.

To highlight some of the other Aussie businesses in NYC, here is the third in a series of articles featuring Australian Cafépreneurs.

We want our readers to learn more about their Aussie owners, and what is unique about their businesses.   We spoke with Adam Sobol who with his partner Sergio D’Auria opened Southern Cross Coffee located at 300 E 5th Street between 2nd and 1st Avenues.

Continue reading “Aussie Cafés in NYC – and where to find them: Southern Cross Coffee”

Aussie Cafés in NYC – and where to find them: Hutch & Waldo.

There has been a ton of recent press featuring Aussie cafés in NYC.  Most feature either the highly successful coffee chains or those found only in NoLIta.

To highlight some of the other Aussie businesses in NYC, here is the second in a series of articles featuring Australian Cafépreneurs.

We want our readers to learn more about their Aussie owners, and what is unique about their businesses.   We spoke with Alastair McFarland who has recently opened Hutch and Waldo located at 347 E 81st @ 2nd Avenue.

Continue reading “Aussie Cafés in NYC – and where to find them: Hutch & Waldo.”

Aussie Cafés in NYC – and where to find them: Saltwater

There has been a ton of recent press featuring Aussie cafés in NYC.  Most feature either the highly successful coffee chains or those found only in NoLIta.

To highlight some of the other Aussie businesses in NYC, here is the first in a series of articles featuring Australian Cafépreneurs. 

We want our readers to learn more about their Aussie owners, and what is unique about their businesses.   For our first location we sat down with Lee and Sid Chitnis, the owners and operators of Saltwater located at 345 E 12th Street between 2nd and 1st Avenues.

Continue reading “Aussie Cafés in NYC – and where to find them: Saltwater”

Moving to the US for Aussies

Chapter 3

The Hierarchy of (Australian Expat) Needs

There is a saying:  “You do not choose New York – New York chooses you”.  There are numerous examples of Australians who arrive in the US with great expectations, yet return to Australia within a few months, shattered emotionally and financially drained.

Many of these Aussies did not have a solid plan in place before arriving in the US. 

In our book Moving to the US for Aussies, we discuss a check list of basic needs before moving to the US.  By definition these are only the minimum requirements, and only the first step in what can be a lengthy and for some, a painful process.

In many of these cases, it is either a sense of isolation from family and friends, or failing to be adequately prepared for a very different New York from what they expected.

This book assumes that you are not moving to the US just to survive:  You are here to be successful, to compete against the world’s best in your field.

New York is a process and having the basics in place is only the first step.  Typically, Australians take around  eighteen months to feel relatively comfortable that they have all of their bases covered; but what if there was a way to do it in less than 90 days? Continue reading “Moving to the US for Aussies”

Sneak Peek – Moving to the US for Aussies

In anticipation of the upcoming release of Moving to the US for Aussies we thought we would publically share a few chapters for those whose move is more imminent.

The book is scheduled for release in November to members of our Private Social Network powered by Microsoft Yammer, and will be accessible via online or the Yammer App.   The “book” contains hyperlinks to important web pages on the Australian Community’s website, as well as external links for reference.

Below is an excerpt.  Enjoy! Continue reading “Sneak Peek – Moving to the US for Aussies”

What NOT to post on Social Media

In May 2017 we published an article Top 10 Australian Expat Mistakes  which shone light on a number of common expat mistakes: Including certain posts on social media.

In light of a recent News.com.au article, we thought it important to point out common social media posts that can cause serious legal and immigration issues, including a denial of a visa, or voiding your existing work visa. Continue reading “What NOT to post on Social Media”

Announcing the Australian Community Center in New York

Who would have thought that six years ago, what started out as a handful of Australian expats banding together to network and share knowledge, would grow into what is now the largest Australian non-profit organization by United States membership.

Further, after launching our Enterprise Social Network in January 2016, the Australian Community’s Yammer network has now grown to house the largest private Australian knowledgebase in the US.

Sixty percent of our 3,700 members, and two thirds of our Board of Directors are Australian women.

Continue reading “Announcing the Australian Community Center in New York”

Top 10 Tips for Australian Job Seekers in New York

The fact is that finding work in one of the most competitive cities on the planet is going to be a challenge for most Australians.

Landing in a US city with a freshly minted J-1 or Green Card is only a ticket to the big league.  If you go into the game without understanding the rules or having a game plan, you will quickly start to accumulate some very unnecessary scar tissue.

Continue reading “Top 10 Tips for Australian Job Seekers in New York”

Moving to the US for Aussies: The Book

If you look at any successful organization, at its core you will find the company handbook.  It details policies and procedures for any new employee joining the company, and is the culmination of years corporate knowledge captured within the organization – So why not have a instruction manual for Australian expats moving to the US?

Have you ever wondered if USCIS handed out a book to anyone arriving in the US on a work visa on all of the traps for young players, how much of an asset it would be?

Well, wonder no more because The Australian Community is producing a book “Moving to the US for Aussies” Continue reading “Moving to the US for Aussies: The Book”

How many Australians are living in New York? V2.0

There has been a great deal of chatter on social media that if you are an Aussie professional worker, then the streets of New York are paved with gold. The Department of Homeland Security’s latest data is separating fact from fiction.

Ask any Aussie visiting New York and they will tell you that NYC is one of the most “Australian Friendly” cities in the World.

You can now buy a flat white coffee on nearly every corner, Tim Tams are sold in Target, and you can have a meat pie delivered to your door.  For the cost of a subway ride you can access more than two dozen Australian establishments serving everything from Barramundi to Vegemite on toast.

Most people attribute the “Australian invasion” to the E-3 visa, however the most recent data from the Department of Homeland Security is telling us that this is nothing more than a myth. Continue reading “How many Australians are living in New York? V2.0”

The Top 10 Questions asked by Australians Living in New York

On Wednesday June 14, 2017 The Australian Community held a private networking event at Bluestone Lane’s DUMBO location in New York to record a video of the Top 10 Questions asked of The Australian Community.

Some of the answers captured in the thirty minute video revealed a number of common mistakes (and incorrect assumptions) made by Australian expats living in New York and the broader US. Continue reading “The Top 10 Questions asked by Australians Living in New York”

June Newsletter

We have a new Website!

The new website (as you can see) is built on WordPress as it is better aligned with our technology roadmap for distributing Public content.

Over the past six years, we have published dozens of articles, and taken hundreds of pictures going back to January of 2012!

As there are literally dozens of writers in the Community who would like to contribute features and articles, this new platform will facilitate a greater engagement for members wishing to contribute social and professional content.

Continue reading “June Newsletter”

Top 10 Reasons to Join The Australian Community

Diving into the deepest end of the most shark infested pool on the planet may be no brainer when it comes to taking your career to the next level.  However, without a social or professional lifeline, you are going to face some serious challenges.

The Australian Community is a 501(c)(3) public charity whose mission is to connect Australians living in the US through social, professional and charitable initiatives.

Continue reading “Top 10 Reasons to Join The Australian Community”

Top 10 Reasons to Connect with our Private Enterprise Social Network

The challenges that face Australians living in the US are constantly evolving.  Our private social network is the perfect platform to access, and share knowledge with other Australian professionals!

The Australian Community is a 501(c)(3) registered public charity whose mission is to connect Australians through social, professional and charitable initiatives.  Since its inception in 2011, we have assisted more Australians overcome the challenges of living in New York than any other public charity.

As we enter our sixth year, we are now using the lessons learned in NYC to assist Australians overcome many of the same challenges across the US.

Continue reading “Top 10 Reasons to Connect with our Private Enterprise Social Network”

Announcing The Australian Community Mentoring Initiative

Finding better ways to connect Australians living in the US is core to our Mission. Therefore, we are very pleased to announce our latest initiative: The Australian Community Mentoring Initiative.

The Australian Community already has programs to assist our members with overcoming many of the challenges of living in the US.   The Australian Community Mentoring Initiative is the next step in assisting our members accelerate their careers to the next level.

Continue reading “Announcing The Australian Community Mentoring Initiative”

Find out how much you could be saving through our Preferred FOREX Rate.

“If there is a better rate on International wire transfers, we have not seen it!”

Members of The Australian Community transfer millions of dollars every year for business and personal needs.  Based on this volume, a preferred rate on International wire transfers has been negotiated with OFX.

Continue reading “Find out how much you could be saving through our Preferred FOREX Rate.”

Top 5 reasons why the E3 visa is not going away anytime soon.

Since the new Administration has signaled sweeping changes to the US’s policy on immigration, The Australian Community has been approached by many of its members who are concerned that the E3 visa may be abolished.

Clearly they are concerned about the potential economic and social impact that this will have on thousands of Australians living and working in the US.

Continue reading “Top 5 reasons why the E3 visa is not going away anytime soon.”

Australians in Startups: Cara Zelas

When educator Cara Zelas and her husband got a dog for the first time, they expected companionship and love. What they couldn’t have predicted was that Little Dude would put Cara on the path to entrepreneurship.

Based on Little Dude’s work as a therapy dog in New York City, Cara has developed a six-book series and literacy based curriculum that teaches children 3 to 7 years of age about kindness, manners, feelings, empathy, respect, and courage.

Continue reading “Australians in Startups: Cara Zelas”

Australians in Startups: Neil Smith

Around the world, governments are struggling to pay for the building or repair of essential infrastructure such as bridges, roads, and airports. Yet there is no easy way for investors to find and analyze all the opportunities to fund such projects.

Neil Smith aims to change that. His startup, Infraccess, will use big data technology to gather all the information about infrastructure projects from across the internet and deliver it to investors at one website.

Continue reading “Australians in Startups: Neil Smith”

What would happen if The Australian Community appeared on Shark Tank?

If you are not familiar with Shark Tank, the TV show features Entrepreneurs pitching highly successful business owners on why they should invest in their company.

Theoretically speaking, if you could successfully pitch the Sharks on the value proposition of our organization to Australian Ex-pats, then attracting new members to join The Australian Community should be a no-brainer.

Continue reading “What would happen if The Australian Community appeared on Shark Tank?”

Our first networking event of 2017 included a private shopping experience on Fifth Avenue, NYC!

It was a packed house with members attending an exclusive networking event and private shopping experience at Microsoft’s Flagship Store on Fifth Avenue.

In January 2016, The Australian Community officially launched its Private Enterprise Social Network powered by Yammer at the Microsoft Store.  Since then, our Yammer Network has grown to the largest Australian private network in North America and contains a searchable knowledgebase built on the experiences of over 5,000 members who have connected with our organization since 2011.

Continue reading “Our first networking event of 2017 included a private shopping experience on Fifth Avenue, NYC!”

New York in the Rear View Mirror:  An Australian’s Perspective.  (Part 3)

Over the past five years, The Australian Community has connected over 5,000 Australians living in New York.  We reached out to members who have returned home, and asked them to share their perspective on living in NYC and their transition back to Australia.

Here is our third article in the series.

What advice would you give to Aussies contemplating the move to NYC?

Continue reading “New York in the Rear View Mirror:  An Australian’s Perspective.  (Part 3)”

New York in the Rear View Mirror:  An Australian’s Perspective.  (Part 2)

Over the past five years, The Australian Community has connected over 5,000 Australians living in New York.  We reached out to members who have returned home, and asked them to share their perspective on living in NYC and their transition back to Australia.

Here is the second article in the series.

How did NYC change you professionally? Continue reading “New York in the Rear View Mirror:  An Australian’s Perspective.  (Part 2)”

New York in the Rear View Mirror:  An Australian’s Perspective.  (Part 1)

Over the past five years, The Australian Community has connected over 5,000 Australians living in New York.  We reached out to members who have returned home, and asked them to share their perspective on living in NYC and the transition back to Australia.

The flood of emails that have poured in have been enough to write a small novel, so the decision was made to create a series of articles.  Here is the first:

What is it like transitioning back to Oz?

Continue reading “New York in the Rear View Mirror:  An Australian’s Perspective.  (Part 1)”

How our Members can quickly Access and Build US Credit – Even before they arrive in the US!

According to the latest US Department of Homeland Security statistics, 3034 Australians obtained legal permanent residency in 2015, and another 5,527 obtained E3 visas.

One of the main challenges facing these and thousands of Australian expats every year is how to access US credit and begin to build a US Credit Score.

Continue reading “How our Members can quickly Access and Build US Credit – Even before they arrive in the US!”

Everything you wanted to know about US Tax Law, but were afraid to ask!

Many Australians are still coming to grips with many US filing requirements, as well as US tax laws.  A podcast was recorded to set the record straight on FBAR filing requirements as well as some common tax missteps often made by expats.

Peter Harper who is a Managing Director with CST Tax Advisors, a leading International tax advisory, recorded the 21 minute podcast that discusses:

What is the Substantial Presence Test?

FBAR – Who has to file?

Superannuation – Do I need to include it in my FBAR?

Other filing requirements for expats.

Common US tax missteps made by Australians.

Continue reading “Everything you wanted to know about US Tax Law, but were afraid to ask!”

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